For the last couple years, this time of month would be showing us some off the chart dry fly fishing; however, at over 8000cfs, our trout seem to be a little shy at podding up with other trout to devour the abundant insects that are on the surface and just below the surface. Dry fly fishing may be a little bit on the slow side, but the nymphing and streamer fishing is off the chart, and if you can find a nose or two, odds are you’ll be able to get them to eat a caddis or a baetis dry if you’re persistent.

Corn Fed Caddis and Stocking Wing Caddis are our current goto caddis patterns for noses, if you drop some sort of caddis emerger behind those, you’ll most likely succeed in hooking one of these caddis eating trout. This time of year we have midges, baetis, march browns, and caddis in the river system, so the best way to describe what our trout are viewing is a buffet on a Sunday after church. If the top water game isn’t treating you well, pull out the nymph box, nymphing the last couple days has been incredibly hot, we have not only been catching a couple fish, we’ve been catching a bunch of fish!

Teagan and Ben floated from Mid Canon to Pelican just a few days ago, in the first 30-40 minutes of the float, they hit a run near Mid, and connected with 20-30 trout that were eating willingly, fire bead wire worms and poxyback sowbugs in the rainbow variety were the key, don’t let anyone tell you that you must be fishing only a tailwater sowbug, because a sowbug in general is going to catch a lot of trout this time of year. Other nymphs that have been working well are Love Bugs, Green Machines, Pheasant Tails, Split Cased BWOs, and Military Mays.

Since our flow is currently over 8000cfs, look to the slower side channels and right along the banks for noses if you’re wanting to fish a dry; and concentrate on the inside of seams to locate where the fish are stacked up, while you are nymphing. We are out on a daily basis, so stop by the shop or call us to get the most up-to-date report.

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